The Old Homestead

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God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

- Romans 5:8

Frederick


JOHN and FRONEY FREDERICK
    John Frederick was born in Germany, probably in the late 1600s. (1)
    Married a woman named Froney.  It seems likely they were married in America since most of their children were born well after John’s latest possible date of  immigration. (2)
    Children: (3)
    Abraham Frederick, July 11, 1723.
    Jacob Frederick.
    Maria Frederick, born Dec. 13, 1725.  Married George Boroway.
    Rachel Frederick, born April 30, 1730.  Married Frederick Stohler.
    Isaac Frederick.
    John immigrated to American before 1718 and settled in Lancaster County, Pa.
    On Oct. 14, 1729, the Pennsylvania General Assembly approved an act that permitted the naturalization of Germans who had immigrated between 1700 and 1718 and purchased land in Lancaster County.  John Frederick is listed among the dozens of landowners who became subjects of the British crown by way of the act.
    John and Froney settled in Donegal Township, which is listed as the birthplace of their son Abraham, who was born in 1723.
    By 1736, John seems to have gained enough prominence in the community to be appointed a “viewer” when colonial officials decided to lay out the Paxton Road, which ran “from the Susquehanna River near the house of John Harris, in the township of Paxton, in the county of Lancaster, and from thence through the said county and part of the county of Chester.”  John Frederick was living in Warwick Township at the time. (4)
    On Dec. 22, 1739, John received a warrant from the proprietaries of Pennsylvania for 25 acres that straddled the boundary of Donegal and Warwick townships.  It’s likely he was also the John Frederick who received a warrant for 200 acres in nearby Rapho Township on May 11, 1744.  This John received a warrant for another 100 acres “adjoining his other Land & George Hoake in Rapho Township” on Dec. 21, 1750. (5)
    John operated a mill.  The fact is noted in the death record of his daughter Maria.  In addition, when another road was laid out in Warwick Township, it was noted that its path ran into “Pexton Road & to John ffredricks Mill.”  This is recorded in the records of the Lancaster County court of quarter session, dated Nov. 4, 1740. (6)  John’s son Abraham also was a miller.
    John’s religious preference is unknown.  However, records provide clues about other members of the family.
    Abraham joined the Moravian denomination in 1744, and records state that he had no religious affiliation before that time.  It seems likely that the Fredericks didn’t attend any church in the early days.
    In the 1740s, Froney became affiliated with the religious community of the Seventh Day Baptists in Ephrata.  The sect’s cloisters at Ephrata were established as a settlement where celibate men and women lived in separate dormitories.  However, there also were married couples who shared the Seventh Day Baptists’ beliefs and lived in the surrounding countryside. 
    The death records of three of Froney’s children indicate an affiliation with the Ephrata community.  Maria’s death record states: “Her mother became a Baptist at Ephrata, and Maria was baptized by them in 1744.  After about 4 yrs. however, she left them.”  And Rachel’s death record says: “She moved with her mother to Ephrata.” (7)  In addition to Froney’s daughters, her son Jacob also joined the Ephrata community.  The death of “Br. Jacob Friedrich” is noted in the community’s records in 1773.  The list also mentions his mother, indicating that the two had been “forgotten” in the community’s full register of members. (8)  Since all of the records mention only a “mother,” it seems unlikely that John followed his wife to Ephrata.
    Although Jacob remained affiliated with the community until he died, Froney’s daughters didn’t stay for very long.  Rachel became a Moravian in 1759 and Maria became one in 1772.
    John died in early 1757.  His will was proved on May 10, 1757.  Since Froney is mentioned as his wife in the abstract of the will, she was probably still alive at that point.

(1) John Frederick was naturalized in Lancaster County, Pa., through an act of the General Assembly on Oct. 14, 1729, according to “Authentic History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” by William L. Iscrupe and Shirley G.M. Iscrupe, page 417-418.  (2) Froney is mentioned as John’s widow in his will, which is available at “Will Abstracts 1721-1819:  Lancaster Co, PA,” at USGenWeb Archives.  (3) The children are listed in John’s will.  Abraham’s birthdate and place are recorded at “The Moravian Graveyards of Lititz, Pa., 1744-1905,” by Abraham Reinke Beck, from Transactions of the Moravian Historical Society, Volume 7, Jan. 1, 1905, page 243.  Maria and Rachel’s birth dates and husbands are listed in “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, by F. Edward Wright, page 178.  Their husbands’ surnames are spelled Burrowey and Stoter in the abstract of John’s will.  (4) “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” by Franklin Ellis, Samuel Evans, 1883, page 310.  (5) The records appear in “Pennsylvania, Land Warrants and Applications, 1733-1952,” at Ancestry.com.  (6) “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Quarter Sessions Abstracts (1729-1742), Book 1,”edited by Gary T. Hawbaker, page 100.  (7) The Fredericks’ religious lives are mentioned in “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, by F. Edward Wright, pages 178 and 189.  (8) “The Registers of the Ephrata Community,” by Julius F. Sachse, from The Pennsylvania Magazine Of History And Biography, Vol. 14, 1890, page 305.


ABRAHAM and ANNA ELISABETH FREDERICK
    Abraham Frederick was born July 11, 1723, in Donegal Township, Lancaster County, Pa., to John and Froney Frederick. (1)
    Married Anna Elisabeth Treihardt, or Dreythart, in Februaru 1744.  She was born Sept. 27, 1719, at Hornbach, Zweibruecken, Germany. (2)
    Children: (3)
    Abraham Frederick, Jan. 22, 1745.
    Elizabeth Frederick, born Nov. 9, 1747.  Married Jacob Ricksecker.
    John Frederick, Nov. 1, 1749.
    Maria Frederick, Oct. 28, 1751.  Died young.
    Maria Frederick, Sept. 11, 1753. Died young.
    Philip Frederick, born Sept. 26, 1755.
    Peter Frederick, born Feb. 4, 1757.
    Jacob Frederick, born March 9, 1759.
    Rachel Frederick, born March 9, 1759.  Married John Ricksecker..
    Anna Maria Frederick, born Nov. 28, 1760. Married John Miller.
    Anna Rosina Frederick, born Jan. 17, 1763.
    Barbara Frederick, born March 26, 1766.  Died soon afterward.
    Abraham grew up in the Conestoga area of Lancaster County.  His father was a miller and Abraham eventually followed that trade.  He also worked as a carpenter. (4)
    According to Moravian records, Abraham originally had no religious affiliation, but “was spiritually awakened and bapt(ized) by the Moravians in 1744.”
    In that same year, Abraham married a widow named Anna Elisabeth Nussbaum.  Elisabeth was born in the Zweibruecken area and had been baptized in a Reformed church in Mauschbach on Oct. 4, 1719.  She had immigrated with her first husband, Benjamin Nussbaum and two young children, in 1743.  However, the children died during the voyage and Benjamin died soon thereafter. (5)
    Abraham and Elisabeth were accepted into the Moravian church during Donegal congregation day in Bethlehem on May 26, 1749.  They were first admitted to communion on March 12, 1750, in Lebanon.  (6)  For the next few decades the Fredericks – usually spelled Friedrich in German-language church records – appear in the congregations records, either having their children baptized or serving as the sponsors of other couples’ children.
    Abraham and Anna Elizabeth appear to have lived in Donegal Township.  Church records indicate that their daughter Elizabeth was born there in 1747.  The same records indicate that Anna Maria was born in Mount Joy Township in 1760.  It’s likely the family stayed in the same area but their municipality changed when Mount Joy was established in the 1750s.  Lancaster County property records might confirm this supposition.
    Abraham was a miller, who operated at least one grist mill.  Most of the tax records simply place an “m” after his name, indicating that he owned a mill. (7)  The 1779 list says “g.m.,” which is the designation for a grist mill.
    The 1771 list says: “Frederick, Abra. 2 m.s.”  The “2 m” would seem to indicate that he operated two mills.  However, the Pennsylvania Archives doesn’t offer a meaning for the “s” in the list.  It states that the meanings of many of the abbreviations have been lost.  However, another source might offer a clue.  “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” from 1883, notes that Abraham owned a still. In its account of Mount Joy Township, the history says: “The tax return of 1780 shows that next to farming the most common occupation was distilling. No less than six stills were reported in the township, the owners being John Bishop, Abraham Frederick, Abram Hear (Hare), Christian Hear (Hare), John Lynch, and Jacob Peters. Abram Hear also paid tax on two mills.” (8)
    It’s uncertain when Abraham became affiliated with the Moravian church, which believes in pacifism.  It’s possible that he didn’t join until very late in life.  However, if he joined earlier, the affiliation with the peace church didn’t prevent him and his sons from becoming involved in the American Revolution.
    On Dec. 15, 1774, Abraham was elected to represent Mount Joy Township on Lancaster County’s Committee of Observation. (9)
    In its account of Mount Joy, “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania” describes events at the start of the Revolution and the committee’s duties.  “Here, as elsewhere in the county, the people were divided in regard to the sentiments they entertained toward the support of independence. Many of those loyal to the American cause and active in its advocacy and enforcement became Associators, and those who refused to take part in the opposition to Great Britain were Non-Associators. The men selected in this township for the county committee of observation, to ascertain and report upon the conduct of all persons touching the general association which had been formed in Philadelphia, were James Cunningham and Abraham Frederick.” (9)
    It seems that the Moravians’ pacifism took root in some of the family members – at least for a while.  Abraham’s son Philip was fined for refusing to join the militia in 1777.  He appears on a list of “the Non-Associators of 1777, who were uniformly assessed for the prosecution of the war, in which they refused to take part, the sum of £3 10s.” (10)
    The Moravians experience additional hardship at the hands of Lancaster County patriots.  An article on the Journal of the American Revolution website describes friction that arose between local authorities and the members of this peace church. (11)
    “The most morally questionable actions of the militia, under the direction of County Lieutenants, was the persistent harassment of Moravian communities.  Though supported by Congress, Moravians were a target by local authorities because, as per their religious beliefs, they were pacifists and refused to serve.  In addition to their stance of neutrality, many refused to take the Oath of Allegiance, feeling that doing so would go against their religious contracts. … The Moravians, as a result this attitude, suffered horrible abuses.
    “These persecutions were not carried out by the militia alone; the Committees of Observation and Inspection in Northampton and Lancaster levied ridiculous fines on the Moravian communities.  Some had their peaceful homes turned into war hospitals and others into prisons for Hessians captured during the New Jersey and Philadelphia campaigns.  The enforcement of these measures were carried out by the local militia, however — again at the behest of the County Lieutenants.
    “While usually acting under the guidance of County officials, sometimes the militia took matters into their own hands.  In one such troubling incident, after the Moravians of Lititz in Lancaster County had all their firearms confiscated by the local County government, a group of local militia arrived armed and equipped. After several names were read aloud, 14 Moravian men were systematically rounded up and taken away from their families — right in the middle of a day.  They were held under guard in the militia Captain’s house and then taken to jail, paraded through town as people shouted slurs and insults at them.  After a day or so, the men were released by the Committee of Observation because they had not given any order to detain them. This act was committed by what many consider today to be ‘patriot militiamen’.”
    It seems very likely that at least Philip was among the targeted Moravians.  I do not know whether Abraham was still on the Lancaster County Committee of Observation at this point. 
    Whether because of a change in heart or because of persecution, Philip’s pacifism doesn’t seem to have lasted.  In 1781, he appears on the muster rolls of Capt. Thomas Robinson’s company, along with his brothers Peter and John, who had been members of the unit since at least 1778. (12)
    Capt. Robinson’s unit does not appear to have been called to active duty during the time covered by the muster rolls in the Pennsylvania Archives.  However, Abraham and Anna Elizabeth’s son Abraham does appear to have been a member of a unit that did get involved in the fighting.  His mother’s death notice states: “Her oldest son, Abraham, lost his life in the Revolutionary War.”
    In 1782, the elder Abraham’s name begins appearing on the Capt. Robinson’s muster rolls.  Abraham Frederick is listed as an “Almoner” on rolls for Oct. 7, 1782, and April 21, 1783, and for the year 1782 in general.  Few – if any – other companies had an almoner so I’m not certain exactly what his role was.  It’s very likely that his job involved distributing alms to needy members, similar to an almoner in a church of the time. (13)
    During this time, Lancaster County tax records show that Abraham owned 100 acres in Mount Joy Township.  In one year, 1773, Abraham is listed as owning 200 acres.  It seems likely that the additional 100 acres had belonged to his brother Jacob, who may have died before the 1773 taxes were collected.  In 1771 and 1772, the tax lists show that Abraham and Jacob each held 100 acres in the Mount Joy.  Jacob disappears from the list in 1773, the same year that Abraham is listed as owning 200 acres.  In the next available list in the Pennsylvania Archives – 1779 – Abraham is once again listed as owning 100 aces.  It’s possible that he sold the land on behalf of Jacob’s heirs.  Once again, searching Lancaster property records should reveal exactly what happened.
    In addition to his land, Abraham was taxed for the livestock he owned.  That ranged from four horses and four cattle in 1771 to two horses, four cattle and eight sheep in 1779.
    During the late 1770s, Abraham’s sons started establishing their own households.  In the 1779 tax records, John and Peter are listed under Rapho Township, which adjoined Mount Joy Township.  However, in 1782, Philip and Peter are listed back in Mount Joy, with neither owning any property.  It seems possible that some sort of economic difficulty forced them to move back to the family farm.
    Abraham probably retired in 1785.  In that year, he drops from the tax records while John suddenly acquires 100 acres of land in Mount Joy Township, probably his father’s property.  In 1786, Abraham is listed as an “inmate” in Warwick Township, probably living with his son Philip.  Philip was taxed for 60 acres of land and two mills, one of which is referred to as “Lititz Mill.” (14)
    By January 1787, when Abraham wrote his will, the Fredericks had moved into a house in Lititz.
    Abraham died Oct. 16, 1788.  When he wrote his will, he said he was “in Health of Bodye” so he does not appear to have been feeble at the time. (15)
    In his will, Abraham stipulated that “my loving Wife Elizabeth shall have the one Ent of dwelling house and the Kitchen which we have in possession now in the Village of Lititz which stands upon the Lot of Ground Number 42, and also half of the garden.”  The other half of the property was given to Rachel and her husband John Ricksecker.  Rachel and John were to receive the entire property after Elizabeth’s death.  Abraham also bequeathed funds to the three surviving daughters of his son Abraham, who had died in the Revolution.  .
    Anna Elizabeth died Jan. 7, 1804.
    The Fredericks are buried at the Moravian Church in Lititz.  Abraham’s tombstone, which is set into the ground near a tree has been rubbed smooth.  It can be identified only because its specific location is cited in an account of the cemetery.

 (1) Abraham’s birth date, approximate birthplace and occupations are among the information contained in “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, by F. Edward Wright, page 189.  His birth date and exact birthplace are also recorded at “The Moravian Graveyards of Lititz, Pa., 1744-1905,” by Abraham Reinke Beck, from Transactions of the Moravian Historical Society, Volume 7, Jan. 1, 1905, page 243.  His parents are listed in his father’s will, an abstract of which can be found at “Will Abstracts 1721-1819:  Lancaster Co, Pa.,” at USGenWeb Archives.  (2) Anna Elisabeth’s maiden name is spelled in various ways, most of which sound very similar in German.  The couple’s approximate wedding date, and Elisabeth’s birthplace, birth date and maiden name are among the information contained in the family register of the Moravian church in Donegal/Mounty Joy, Lancaster County, Pa., as listed in “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, by F. Edward Wright, page 189.  The same information is provide in her death listing in “Moravian Graveyards of Lititz,” page 249, but is more general, stating that she was born in 1719 in Rhenish Bavaria.  (3) Frederick and Elizabeth’s children and their birth dates are listed in a record of the family associated with the Donegal/Mount Joy congregation of the Moravian Church, which is recorded at “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, by F. Edward Wright, Willow Bend Books, Westminster, Md., 2000, page 189.  The book also contains the baptismal records of most of the children on pages 160-164.  It should be noted that the family register lists the birth of a Johanna, the birth records reveal this was actually Johannes, or John.  (4) The information on Abraham’s occupation, religious life and marriage to Elisabeth, as well as information on Elisabeth’s early life, are contained in the family register of the Donegal/Mount Joy Moravian church, page 189.  (5) The information on her two children with Nussbaum comes from “Moravian Graveyards of Lititz,” page 249.  (6) “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, pages 182 and 187.  (7) The Lancaster County tax lists for 1771-1782 appear in Pennsylvania Archives, Series 3, Vol. 17, pages 121, 288, 356, 514 and 714.  Records for 1783-1786 are available at “Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801,” available at Ancestery.com.  (8) “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” by Franklin Ellis and Samuel Evans, 1883, page 992.  (9) “Commemoration of Lancaster County in the revolution at ‘Indian Rock’ : Williamson Park, near ‘Rockford’, the home of General Edward Hand, M.D., Friday, P.M. September 20, CMMXII,” by the Lancaster County Historical Society, published 1912, and available at www.archive.org.  (10) “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” page 991.  (8) “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” page 991.  (11) “The Darker Side of the Militia,” an article by Thomas Verenna in the Journal of the American Revolution,  Feb. 26, 2014, available at allthingsliberty.com.  (12) The militia muster rolls appear in the Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Vol. VII, pages 196-197, 203-204, 208-209, 450-452, 685-687, 699-701, 723-724, 739-740, 756-757, 777 and 783-785.  (13) Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, vol. VII, pages 450, 739, 756 and 784.  (14) The township tax record includes a second listing for a Philip Frederick, who owned 100 acres.  It seems more likely that this represented a second property rather than a second Philip. (15) “Pennsylvania, Wills and Probate Records, 1683-1993,” at Ancestry.com.


PETER and EVA FREDERICK
    Peter Frederick was born Feb. 4, 1757, in Lancaster County, Pa., to Abraham and Anna Elizabeth (Treithardt) Frederick. (1)
    Married Eva Hoog, probably about 1779. (2)
    Children: (3)
    John Frederick, born Sept. 30, 1780.
    Caroline Elizabeth Frederick, born Jan. 9, 1781.  Married John Blickensderfer.
    Maria Rachel Frederick, born April 24, 1783.  Married Henry Keller.
    Louise Salome Frederick, born Sept. 17, 1785.  Married Christian Blickensdoerfer.
    Eva Catharine Frederick, born Dec. 11, 1787. 
    Peter Frederick, born March 1792.
    Barbara Margaret Frederick, born about 1795.  Married Benjamin Blickensderfer.
    Susannah Frederick.  Married Jacob Romig Jr.
    Abraham Frederick.
    Jacob Frederick.
    Joseph Frederick.
    Peter grew up in Lancaster County, where his father was a miller in Mount Joy Township.  The family was associated with the Donegal/Mount Joy congregation of the Moravian Church, where Peter was baptized.
    Peter does not seem to have joined his parents’ church, at least not right away.  On Aug. 17, 1770, he was added to a list called the “Moravian Society” – “that is, an association of such persons who are not full members of the Moravian congregation, but who are served by our [Moravian] missionaries’ counseling and visits.” (4)  However, starting in 1781, several of his children were baptized at the Moravian Church in nearby Lititz. (5)
    Despite the family’s affiliation with a pacifist church, the Fredericks were involved in the Revolutionary War.  Abraham served on the Lancaster County Committee of Observation and as an “almoner” for a militia company.  Peter, John and Philip appear on the rolls of the same unit.  And Peter’s brother Abraham was killed in the war. (6)
    Peter is listed as a private in the Fifth Class of Capt. Thomas Robinson’s company, which mustered in Mounty Joy Township on April 20, 1778. (7)  His brother Philip appears in the company’s Third Class.  The brothers appear on the company’s muster rolls consistently from that date until 1783.  John’s name starts appearing in 1781 and their father is listed as the company’s “almoner” starting in 1782.  The position of almoner was very rare and probably involved distributing aid to the needy, as was the case with almoners for church bodies.
    The Pennsylvania Archives doesn’t contain any records that indicate active service for Robinson’s company during the dates covered by the 1778-1783 muster rolls.  The company was part of Col. Alexander Lowrey’s battalion.  Lowrey’s battalion was called into active service when threats arose in 1776 and 1777 but does not appear to have seen any action against the British.  I have not found muster rolls for these deployments so it’s uncertain whether any of the Fredericks were involved. (8)
    During the war, Peter also appears in Lancaster County tax records.  He seems to make his first appearance in 1779 in Rapho Township, which adjoins Mount Joy Township. (9)  Peter is listed as a shoemaker who owned 20 acres and a cow.  His brother John is also listed in the township but without property.  It’s possible they lived together. 
    In the list that covers late 1779 and the beginning of 1780, Peter and John are again listed in Rapho Township.  Neither one is listed as owning any land.  John owned two horses and three head of cattle and Peter owned none.
    By 1781, Peter had moved back to Mount Joy Township.  He is listed as a shoemaker who owned nothing but a cow.  Judging from the lack of property indicated on the previous tax list and the fact that he moved back to Mounty Joy, it seems likely that Peter had encountered economic difficulties and decided to move back with his father.  Things remained about the same for the next few years.  In 1782 and 1783, Peter owned a horse and a cow and lived in Mount Joy Township. (10)
    Peter returned to Rapho Township by 1785.  In that year, he is listed as owning 50 acres, two horses and two cattle.  The following year, Peter is listed as owning 54 acres, two horses and a cow.
    It seems likely that Peter’s move back to Rapho Township was prompted by changes in the family’s situation.  About this time, Peter’s father appears to have given his land and mill to John and moved to Warwick Township.  Abraham is listed that township’s tax records along with Philip, who is listed as owning 60 acres and two mills.
    Peter’s name doesn’t seem to appear in the 1790 U.S. Census.  Either he was missed or his family was living in a household headed by someone else.  In Pennsylvania’s 1793 census, Peter is listed in Warwick Township. (11)
    In the 1800 U.S. Census, Peter is listed in Mount Joy Township.  His household contained three males under 10, a male age 26-44, a female under 10 and a female 16-25.  However, in the Pennsylvania census for 1800, Peter is listed in Rapho Township.  It’s uncertain whether he moved during the year or his home was close to the boundary between the two townships.
    Peter does not appear in the 1810 Census records available online but it appears that some pages of the Rapho Township listings are missing.
    In 1812, Peter and his children moved westward to Tuscarawas County, Ohio. 
    The records of the Moravian Church in Gnadenhutten mention Peter’s arrival in an overview of activities for 1812. (12)  He was part of a large group from Lititz – mostly Blickenderfers – who joined the congregation that year.  The account lists him as “Brother Peter Frederick.”  However, it also notes: “Peter Frederick is not yet baptised, also does not yet belong to church.”  It’s possible that one reference is to the father and the other is to the son.
    A John Peter Friedrich joined the congregation through baptism.  Once again, it’s difficult to say whether this was the father or the son.
    A Peter Frederick appears in Tuscarawas County task lists in 1816 but, once again, it’s hard to say which Peter it refers to. (13)
    In the 1820 Census, Peter is listed in Dohrman Township.  His household included two males under 10; a male 10-15; a male 16-25; a male 26-44; a male 45 and older; a female under 10; a female 10-15; a female 26-44; and a female 45 and older.  Because of the ages of the people listed, it seems very likely that the family of one of Peter’s children lived in the household.  Several of Peter’s children appear in the census records for nearby townships.  Jacob lived in Dohrman Township and the younger Peter lived in Warwick Township, near his in-laws.  John Blickenderfer, Caroline Elizabeth’s husband, also is listed in Warwick. (14)
    The area where Peter settled later became part of Mill Township.  The 1884 history of Tuscarawas County says, “The exact order of its settlement is not known, but in 1820 the following resident land-owners were here, and some had arrived many years before 1820: …Peter Frederick, a German and a shoe-maker from Pennsylvania, the northwest quarter of section 30.” (15)
    A listing of Mill Township pioneers describes Peter’s land, saying that he “Owned 168 acres, the N.E. quarter of Sec. 21.  In 1821 he divided this tract equally between his 3 sons, Abraham, Jacob and Joseph.” (16)
    Peter died in September 1825.  The Moravian records say, “The married Peter Friederick died and was buried in Sharon. The funeral sermon was delivered by a Dunker preacher, by the name of Herman. (17)
    Peter is buried at the Sharon Moravian Cemetery in Tuscarawas.  His tombstone is heavily damaged so a cemetery inventory reads: “???RICK, Peter   -1825.” (18)

(1) Peter’s birth is listed under “Petrus” in the baptism records of the Moravian Church in Donegal/Mount Joy in Lancaster County, Pa.  It appears in “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, by F. Edward Wright, Willow Bend Books, Westminster, Md., 2000, page 162.  Peter is listed in Abraham’s will, cited at “Will Abstracts 1721-1819:  Lancaster Co, PA,” in the USGenWeb archives.  (2) Eva Hoog is listed as Peter’s wife in birth records cited in “Pennsylvania Births: Lancaster County, 1778-1800,” by John T. Humphrey, Humphrey Publications, Washington, DC, 1997.  It’s possible that Eva was the Eva Maria Hoch who was born Dec. 13, 1757, in Lancaster County, to Hanns Jerg Hoch and his wife.  The birth is listed at “Pennsylvania Births: Lancaster County, 1723-1777,” by John T. Humphrey, Humphrey Publications, Washington, DC, 1997.  (3) The births of Caroline Elisabeth, Eva Catharine, Louise Salome and Maria Rachel are listed in “Pennsylvania Births: Lancaster County, 1778-1800,” by John T. Humphrey, Humphrey Publications, Washington, DC, 1997.  The birth date, parents and husband of Caroline Elizabeth are listed in her death record, which is available at “Gnadenhutte Church Register, Vol. I of the Gnadenhutten Congregation on the Musking. started in the Year 1800,” prepared by Anneliese Rochester in 1987 and posted online at usgwarchives.net.    Abraham, Jacob and Joseph are identified as Peter’s sons in an 1821 deed in which he divided a tract of land among the three.  The record is mentioned in “Early Tuscarawas County land records,” Tuscarawas Pioneer Footprints, Vol. 1, No. 3, Feb. 1973, page 18, compiled by the Tuscarawas County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society.  There are no records directly linking Peter to his father; however, he appears in Gnadenhutten church records.  No other Frederick families appear in contemporary records of the Gnadenhutten church or of Tuscarawas County.  A similar case has to be built for John.  He doesn’t appear in the church records, but his movements closely follow the younger Peter’s and they appear in several deeds together.  Peter and John’s birth dates are indicated on their tombstones, as listed at “Marion County Cemetery Inscriptions,” compiled by Paul J. and Barbara Midlam, and available at www.heritagepursuit.com.  Maria’s approximate birth year is provided at Findagrave.com, which contains a photo of her very worn tombstone.  Mary Rachel’s marriage is recorded at “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” at FamilySearch.org.  In addition to the children list above, it’s possible that the Fredericks had a son who died as a newborn.  The records of the Donegal/Mount Joy Moravian Church list the following death on page 178: “29 Jun 1790, a newborn son of Pet (?) Friedrich.”   The husband of Louise Salome is listed in the baptismal records at “Church Book of the Brethren’s Congregation of Beersheba on the Westside of the Muskingum River opened in the Year of Our Lord 1805,” translated and transcribed by Maxine Renner Eberle, 1987, Ragersville, Ohio, Historical Society.  One of Peter and Eva’s daughters married Benjamin Herbach, or Harbaugh.  In the Beersheba baptismal records, Benjamin’s wife is identified as Catharine.  However, the wife is identified as Catharine in Tuscarawas County marriage records available at “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” at FamilySearch.org.  That married was recorded in 1824.  Meanwhile, these same county marriage records say that Eve Frederick married Jacob Keller in 1829.  At this point, it seems most likely that these records refer to two different women.  Finally, the Tuscarawas County records list the marriages of Barbara Frederick to a Benjamin Blickensderfer in 1818 and Susannah Amanda Frederick to Jacob Romig Jr. in 1826.  It seems certain that these women were daughters of Jacob and Eva because they appear in Moravian church records before they were married and their weddings were performed by the Jacob Rauschenberger, one of the Moravian ministers.  Barbara’s approximate birth year is from the 1850 Census of Warwick Township, Tuscarawas County.  (4) “Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Church Records of the 18th Century,” Vol. 4, Page 186.  (5) “Pennsylvania Births: Lancaster County, 1778-1800,” by John T. Humphrey, Humphrey Publications, Washington, DC, 1997.  (6) See Abraham Frederick Sr.’s profile for details on the family’s activities during the war.  (7) Peter’s militia records appear in the Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Vol. VII, pages 196-197, 203-204, 208-209, 450-452, 685-687, 699-701, 723-724, 739-740, 756-757, 777 and 783-785.  (8) Lowrey’s military activities are mentioned in a profile in “History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania,” by Franklin Ellis and Samuel Evans, 1883, page 762.  (9) Unless otherwise noted, the tax records are from “Pennsylvania, Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801,” available at Ancestery.com.  (10) The 1782 list is in Pennsylvania Archives, Series 3, Vol. 17, page 674.  (11) The Pennsylvania censuses are available at “Pennsylvania, Septennial Census, 1779-1863,” at Ancestry.com.  (12) “Excerpts From Ministers Diaries Found at the Gnadenhutten Moravian Church located at Gnadenhutten, Tuscarawas County, Ohio,” posted on Rootsweb.com on July 24, 1999 by Mary Meyers Williams. (13) “Early Ohio Tax Records,” compiled by Esther Weygandt Powell, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, page 388.  (14) The transcription available at Ancestry.com indicates that the Fredericks and most of the surrounding families owned slaves at the time of the 1820 Census.  This is incorrect.  The census taker transposed the columns for occupations and for slaves, which gives the impression that everyone in the area owned slaves but no one was a farmer.  (15) “The History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio,” published by Warner, Beers in 1884, page 579.  (16) Mill Township Pioneers in “Early Tuscarawas County land records,” an articles in Tuscarawas Pioneer Footprints, by the Tuscarawas County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society, Vol. 1, No. 3, Feb. 1973, page 18.  (17) “Diary of Gnadenhutten, Beersheba and Sharon, May 1816 to Dec 31 1826,” by Jacob Rauschenberger, Pastor, translation by Allen P. Zimmerman at Gnadenhutten, Ohio 1955, Church records from Tuscarawas County, Posted on Rootsweb, posted  July 25-28, 1999.  (18) “Tuscarawas County, Ohio, Cemeteries,” Vol. III, Tuscarawas County Genealogical Society, New Philadelphia, Ohio, 1984, page 185.


PETER and FANNY FREDERICK
    Peter Frederick was born in February 1792 to Peter and Eva Frederick in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. (1)
    Married Verona Keller on Feb. 22, 1813, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio.  Verona, who is listed as Fanny in later records, was born in Switzerland to Martin and Eva Keller. (2)
    Children: (3)
    Henry Frederick, born Feb. 2, 1814.
    Mary Frederick, born about 1816.  Married Joseph Kimball Matteson.
    Eve Caroline Frederick, born Jan. 28, 1818.  Married Green G. Miller.
    Benjamin Frederick, born May 6, 1820.  Died Feb. 13, 1824.
    Elizabeth Frederick, born about 1823.  Married John C. Brady.
    Jacob Frederick, born May 11, 1825.
    Sarah Frederick, born about 1828.  Married Edward C. Warner.
    Diana Frederick, born about 1831.  Married Willy Fowler.
    Peter’s family moved from Pennsylvania to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, when he was about 20 years old.  The arrival of his father and other relatives is recorded in the records of the Moravian Church at Gnadenhutten in 1812.
    Peter served in the Ohio militia during the War of 1812.  Peter Frederick is listed as a private in the company of Capt. George Richardson, which served from Aug. 29 to Oct. 29, 1812, and from Aug. 31 to Dec. 1, 1813.  The company’s home county is not indicated but many of the soldiers’ names – including Richardson’s – match those of men who appear in Tuscarawas County in the 1820 Census. (4)  Although Peter’s family was affiliated with the pacifist Moravian church, they do not seem to have shied away from military service.  His father, uncles and grandfather served in the Lancaster County militia during the Revolution. (5)
    Peter’s first enlistment in the militia followed the surrender of Detroit to the British. It seems likely the company was mustered as a response to that debacle. The second period of enlistment would have encompassed the naval Battle of Lake Erie and the Battle of the Thames, a land battle in Ontario, Canada.  The militia was probably called to active duty as a precaution.  Peter’s widow was later awarded bounty lands because she was the widow of a soldier in the War of 1812.
    In early 1813, Peter married Verona Keller at the Moravian Church at Gnadenhutten, where their families worshiped.  She had been born in Switzerland and her family had immigrated to the United States in 1803 and settled in Tuscarawas County. (6)
    The Keller family was very active in the Gnadenhutten church and Verona’s name – under various spellings – appears numerous times in its records. (7)  On June 4, 1803, she was one of the “older girls” who observed their festival.  On Sept. 10, 1809, she was received into the congregation.  In June 1812, she was confirmed and in July she took her first communion. 
    In 1815, the church’s records state that John Peter Friedrich was baptized into the church.  It seems most likely that this was the son rather than the father.  On Sept. 10, 1826, Peter was a first-time participant in the choir festival for married brothers and sisters.
    The 1820 and 1830 censuses list Peter in Warwick Township, Tuscarawas County.  In 1820, the household contained two males under age 10; one male 16-25; one male 26-44; two females under 10; a female 10-15; and a female 26-44. (8)  Since the household contained more children than the couple had at the time, it seems likely that a brother and sister of either Peter or Fanny lived in there.  In 1830, the household contained a male under 5, a male 15-19, a male 30-39, a female under 5, a female 5-9, a female 10-14, a female 15-19 and a female 30-39.
    Tragedy struck the family in 1824 when 3-year-old Benjamin died.  The Moravian pastor’s diary notes, “He died on the 13th at three.  Since it snowed and rained incessantly, and as the river had already risen high, we could not go to Sharon so the body was interred in quietness.”  Benjamin was probably the male child who was listed in the 1820 Census but not in the 1830.
    At some point before the 1840 Census was taken, Peter moved to Big Island Township in Marion County, Ohio.  Although it’s uncertain exactly when the family arrived in Marion County, Peter was already selling land there in 1834.  On March 7 of that year, Peter sold 80 acres to Joseph Smith.  On Aug. 30 of that year, Peter was listed as a resident of the county when he paid Thomas Hewitt $50 for Lot No. 1 in the Town Plat of Big Island.  Over the next few years Peter was involved in a number of real estate transactions in Marion County, usually buying or selling tracts of land covering 40 or 80 acres. (9)
    The 1840 Census indicates that Peter Frederick’s household in Big Island Township contained a male 10-14, a male 40-49, a female under 5, a female 5-9, a female 10-14, a female 15-19 and a female 40-49.
    Peter apparently operated a hotel in Big Island Township.  “History of Marion County, Ohio and Representative Citizens,” from 1907, states: “In 1831 Big Island had three stores and two taverns. Mr. Morgan kept hotel in a brick building in the place, which was afterwards conducted by D. Thurlow, John R. Knapp, Sr., Peter Frederick and Hiram Halsted.” (10)
    It appears that Peter ran a tavern in his hotel and that it sometimes landed him in trouble.  The docket for the October 1846 term of the Marion County Common Pleas Court lists the case “State of Ohio vs. Peter Frederick” for keeping a tavern without a license.  The March 1847 term lists “State of Ohio vs. Peter Frederick” for keeping a tavern.  It’s likely these involve the same case, but it’s possible two separate infractions were involved. (11)
    The 1907 history of Marion County offers an interesting look at early life in the Fredericks’ hometown.  “In the early days Big Island was a favorite place of rendezvous on military muster day.  The event was usually held on Saturday afternoon when drinking and fighting were the order of the day. It is said that on one such occasion on Christmas Day, 13 fights were in full swing at one time. It was called a ‘free for all’ and no one ever attempted to interfere with the combatants.”  It seems likely that Peter’s tavern was a focal point of some of these activities. (12)
    For some reason, Peter and Fanny seem to have been missed by the census taker in 1850, and Fanny was missed again in 1860.
    Peter died May 2, 1852. 
    In 1856, Fanny applied for a land bounty based on Peter’s service in the War of 1812.  She received 160 acres.
    Fanny died June 13, 1869. She is buried beside her husband at Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Big Island Township. (13)  Sadly, a visit to the cemetery in 2016 reveals that born of their tombstones – apparently thin and of fragile marble – had broken off and were propped against another stone.

(1) Peter’s tombstone says he was “Age 60y 3 m” when he died May 2, 1852, according to the transcriptions of Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Big Island Township, Marion County, Ohio, at Findagrave.com.  Peter’s parents can be identified by the fact that the elder Peter is the only Frederick listed at that time in the records of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and of the Moravian church at Gnadenhutten in that county, where both men attended. That is the church where the younger Peter was married in 1814. The elder Peter moved to Tuscarawas County from the area around Lititz, Lancaster County, Pa., in 1812, so it can be determine that the younger Peter was born in that area.  The move is mentioned in church records available at “Excerpts From Ministers Diaries Found at the Gnadenhutten Moravian Church located at Gnadenhutten, Tuscarawas County, Ohio,” posted on Rootsweb.com on July 24, 1999 by Mary Meyers Williams.  It should be noted that the obituary of Peter’s son Jacob provides information that conflicts with this.  The obituary indicates that Jacob spent his early childhood near Chillicothe.  The town is in Ross County, which is the home to a large Frederick family.  However, that family is fairly well documented and Peter does not fit into it.  It’s possible that the friend who wrote the obituary was ill-informed.  Supporting this supposition is the death record of Eve Caroline, which says she was born in Tuscarawas County in 1818.  Her death record is available at “Ohio, Deaths and Burials, 1854-1997,” FamilySearch.org.  (2) The marriage is recorded at “Old Marriages Recorded in County Courts Through 1820: An Index,” by Jean Nathan, compiled and published by the Ohio Genealogical Society, page 367.  The National Archives has Fanny Frederick’s application for a land bounty based on Peter’s service in the War of 1812.  Copies of the original documents were provided by Beverly Robertson, who found them at the National Archives.  It mentioned that she was married in March 1813 by George Miller, a minister of the Gospel.  However, there’s a faint note above this that seems to indicate that Fanny was uncertain of the date of the married.  Verona – sometimes spelled Verone – is listed as the daughter of Martin and Eva Keller in her father’s will, an abstract of which is available in “Gateway to the West,” Vol. II, compiled by Ruth Bowers and Anita Short; Genealogical Publishing Co., page 560.  It is in Tuscarawas County Will Book 1, page 1.  Fanny’s tombstone lies against Peter’s at Pleasant Hill Cemetery.  It should be noted that her son Jacob’s death certificate lists his mother as Elizabeth, though his obituary lists her name as Fanny.  Her tombstone says, “Fanny.”  Jacob’s death certificate was issued Aug. 9, 1910, in Marion County, Ohio.  The obituary appears in the Aug. 20, 1910, edition of The Marion Weekly Star of Marion, Ohio.  Interestingly, Fanny’s children – or at least those who provided responses to census takers – were very confused about her place of birth.  The 1880 Census says Jacob’s father was born in Pennsylvania and his mother was born in New York.  The 1910 Census of Marion, Ohio, states that Jacob’s father was born in Ohio and mother was born in Virginia.  In 1880, the census of Marion County said Eve Caroline Miller’s parents were both born in Pennsylvania.  In 1900, the census says that her parents were both born in Germany.  In all of these cases, it seems likely that the information was provided by a spouse or caregiver.  The only census that appears to get things right is Henry’s listing in Marion County in 1880, which says his father was born in Pennsylvania and mother in Switzerland.  (3) The names of Jacob and Fanny’s children and their spouses are listed in a deed that records the sale of property by Jacob’s heirs.  The deed is in Marion County Deed Book 24, page 566, and is dated Aug. 14, 1853.  Henry’s birth date comes from his grave at La Rue Cemetery in Marion County, which can be seen at Findagrave.com.  Mary’s approximate birth year is listed in the 1870 Census of Bowling Green, Marion County, Ohio.  Eve’s birth date comes from her grave at Pleasant Cemetery in Big Island Township, Marion County, which can be seen at Findagrave.com.  Elizabeth’s approximate birth year comes from the 1850 Census of Big Island Township.  Jacob’s obituary in the Aug. 20, 1910, edition of The Marion Weekly Star of Marion, Ohio, says that he was born on May 11, 1875, but that is obviously an error since it says he was 85 years old.  Sarah’s approximate birth year is indicated in the 1850 Census of Jackson Township, Hardin County, Ohio.   Diana’s birth date is indicated on her grave at Pleasant Hill Cemetery, which can be seen at Findagrave.com.  The baptisms of two of the Frederick’s children appear to be mentioned in Gnadenhutten church records.  Maria Friedrich was baptized in 1816, although she was born “toward the close of the previous year,” according to “Excerpts From Ministers Diaries Found at the Gnadenhutten Moravian Church located at Gnadenhutten, Tuscarawas County, Ohio.”  Elisabeth – “a little daughter of Peter Friedrich” – was baptized April 20, 1823, according to “Diary of Gnadenhutten, Beersheba and Sharon,” from Church Records of Tuscarawas County, posted to Rootsweb.com in July 1999.  Benjamin’s birth and death is mentioned in “Early Records of Death from Diary of the Ministers,” Tuscarawas Pioneer Footprints, Vol. 19, No. 4, Nov. 1991, page 42, Tuscarawas County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society.  (4) “Roster of Ohio Soldiers in the War of 1812,” published by the Adjutant General of Ohio in 1916, pages 17 and 85.  One of the names on the list is “Martin Kellar,” probably Peter’s future brother-in-law.  It should be noted that another Peter Frederick from Ross County and his brothers also served in the militia in 1812.  (5) Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Vol. VII, pages 197, 204, 209, 250-252, 739-740 and others.  (6) “Gnadenhutte Church Register, Vol. I of the Gnadenhutten Congregation on the Musking. started in the Year 1800,” prepared by Anneliese Rochester in 1987 and posted online at usgwarchives.net.  Eva Keller’s death notice says, “In Sep 1803 she came with her family from Europe into this area.”  (7) The church records available at “Excerpts From Ministers Diaries Found at the Gnadenhutten Moravian Church located at Gnadenhutten, Tuscarawas County, Ohio” and “Diary of Gnadenhutten, Beersheba and Sharon,” from Church Records of Tuscarawas County, both at Rootsweb.com.  (8) The transcription available at Ancestry.com indicates that the Fredericks and most of the surrounding families owned slaves at the time of the 1820 Census.  This is incorrect.  The census taker transposed the columns for occupations and for slaves, which gives the impression that everyone in the area owned slaves but no one was a farmer.  (9) The March transaction appears in Marion County Deed Book 11, page 303.   The August transaction appears in Deed Book 8, page 135.  (10) “History of Marion County, Ohio and Representative Citizens,” edited and compiled by J. Wilbur Jacoby, 1907, pages 104-105.  Peter’s proprietorship of the hotel is also mention in “The History of Marion County, Ohio,” 1883, page 652.  (11) “Marion County, Ohio, Court Records,” Marion Area Genealogical Society.  (12) “History of Marion County, Ohio and Representative Citizens,” page 105.  (13) The graves are listed at Findagrave.com under Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Big Island, Marion County, Ohio.


JACOB and KATIE FREDERICK
    Jacob Frederick was born in May 11, 1825, to Peter and Fanny Frederic in Ohio, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. (1)
    Jacob was married three times.  In 1848, he married Mary McDaniel, who died in 1862.  In 1864, he married Catharine Dove, who died in 1873.  After “several years as a widower,” Jacob married Mary Smallwood. (2)
    Jacob’s children with Mary McDaniel: (3)
    Fanny Elizabeth Frederick, born July 21, 1849.  Married Alexander Hedges.
    Nancy Jane Frederick, born about Feb. 20, 1851.  Married Thomas W. Pangborn.
    Amanda Mary Frederick, born Oct. 13, 1852.  Married Jacob Sylvester Brady.
    James Henry Frederick, born Oct. 15, 1854.
    Sarah J. Frederick, born about 1856.  Married Byron Brady.
    William J. Frederick, born about 1857.
    Jacob’s children with Catharine Dove:
    Richard Frederick, born about 1864.
    Emma Frederick, born Oct. 22, 1867.  Married John F.  Fowler.
    Caroline Frederick, or Carrie, born in 1868.  Married a man named Forider, possibly Frederick.
    Clarinda Frederick, or Clara, born April 12, 1870.  Married Henry L. James.
    Robert Frederick, born about 1871.
    Olive Elnora Frederick, or Nora, born March 8, 1872.  Married Thomas C. McDaniel.
    Jacob’s family lived in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, during the 1820s and early 1830s.  They moved westward to Marion County during the 1830s.
    Jacob appears to have established his own homestead before he was 20 years old.  He is listed as a real estate owner in Jackson Township, Wyandot County, Ohio, when it was separated from Hardin County in 1845. (4) 
    On June 8, 1848, Jacob married Mary McDaniel, who was born about 1831 in Ohio. She was the daughter of James McDaniel, who also lived in Jackson Township. (5)
    The 1850 Census lists Jacob as a 23-year-old farmer in Jackson Township.  His wife was 19-year-old Mary.  The only other occupant of his household was the 1-year-old Elizabeth.  Jacob is not listed as owning any real estate.
    The 1850 Census’ agricultural schedules provide a good look at the Fredericks’ farm.
The farm covered 40 acres of improved land and 40 acres of unimproved land, the value of which is not stated.  Jacob owned farm implements and machinery worth $100.  The livestock included 3 horses, 1 milk cow, 11 sheep and 20 swine, valued at a total of $195.  The farm produced 100 bushels of wheat, 200 bushels of Indian corn, 90 bushels of oats, 24 pounds of wool, 3 bushels of peas and beans, 25 bushels of Irish potatoes, 50 pounds of butter, 4 tons of hay and 60 pounds of maple sugar 15.  The value of the animals slaughtered was $15.
    The 1860 Census lists Jacob as a 34-year-old farmer in Jackson Township, with real estate valued at $2,000 and personal property valued at $150.  In addition to his wife Mary, 28 years old, his household included Fanny E., 11; Nancy, 9; Mary M., 7; James K. 5; Sarah J., 4; and William J., 3.
    Mary died Feb. 8, 1862 and was buried at Jackson Center Cemetery in Wyandot County. (6)
    On June 16, 1864, Jacob married Catharine Dove in Wyandot County. (7)  Catharine, who also was known as Katie, was the daughter of Richard and Sarah Dove.  The Doves appear in the 1860 in Jackson Township, Hardin County, which abuts Wyandot County. (8) 
    The Fredericks moved to Marion County sometime before Nora was born in 1872 in Morral.
    Tragically, Jacob was widowed again in 1873. (9)
    Jacob’s obituary reports that he remained a widower for several years before marrying “Mrs. Mary Smallwood.”  However, Marion County records show that Jacob Frederick married “Mrs. Mary Baker” on Nov. 4, 1876.  It seems likely that Smallwood was her maiden name and Baker was her surname during her first marriage, although the opposite is also possible. (10)
    In the 1880 Census, Jacob is listed as a farmer in Montgomery Township, Marion County.  His wife is listed as Mary, who was 44 and had been born in New York.  No children younger than Nora are listed, which would seem to indicate that Mary had no children with Richard before this point.
    The agricultural schedule for the 1880 Census indicates that Fredericks rented their farm for a share of the produce.  The farm contained 30 acres of tilled land, 13 acres of meadowland, pastureland or orchard, 117 acres of woodland and 14 other acres of improved land.  The farm was valued as $4,800.  Farming implements and machinery was valued at $50 and livestock valued at $300.  In 1879, Jacob paid $12 for farm labor.  The value of all farm production for 1879 was $600.  The Fredericks owned four horses; 3 milk cows, which produced 300 pounds of butter in 1879; 13 sheep, which produced 13 fleeces that weighed a total of 52 pounds; eight swine; and 60 barnyard poultry, which produced 150 dozen eggs.  In 1879, they had planted 12 acres in corn, which produced 200 bushels; seven in oats, which produced 133 bushels; 10 acres in wheat, which produced 137 bushels; and an acre in Irish potatoes, which produced 40 bushels.  They also grew apples on an acre, which contained 50 trees and produced 10 bushels, valued at $5.  They cut 25 cords of wood and sold $50 worth. (11)
    Mary died about 1887 and the children then lived with a cousin, Vesta, and her husband Riley Davis. (12)
    It appears that Jacob’s faith was very important to him.  His obituary says, “He ever believed in God and in the power of Christ to forgive sins, and many years ago he united as a member of M.E. church at Forest, and ever lived a humble, faithful Christian.”  His funeral was held at the Pleasant Hill Methodist Church, attended by the Rev. J.A. Sutton of LaRue, who also wrote Jacob’s obituary.  The obit goes on to say: “Years ago, when pastor of the Big Island church, I formed a very pleasant acquaintance with Father Frederick.  He favorably impressed me with his kind, tender, loving mien and manner and it is with pleasure that I now think of him, his genial ways and gentle words.  He frequently attended church service and gave me every assurance that he was endeavoring to lead the life of a true, humble Christian, merely waiting on the border to pass from us into the summer land above.  J.A. Sutton.”
    Late in life, Jacob suffered from economic and health problems.  Records of the Marion County Infirmary in Marion Township list Jacob as a boarder on March 9, 1904. (13)  The 1910 Census lists Jacob as an inmate of the infirmary.  The census indicates that Jacob was an 84-year-old widower who was not able to read or write.
    The notice of his death in The Marion Weekly Star indicates that he had been “removed to the infirmary over 10 years ago.  He was at one time a well-known farmer, but was overtaken by misfortune and lost all he had.”  His obituary notes: “For years past he was in failing health, and slowly and surely descended to the tomb, dying of age and its attending infirmities, leaving ten children, forty-three grandchildren and sixteen great-grandchildren.” (14)
    Jacob died Aug. 8, 1910.  He was buried at Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Big Island Township. (15)
   (1) Parents are listed as Peter and Elizabeth on Jacob’s death certificate issued Aug. 9, 1910, in Marion County, Ohio.  His obituary in the Aug. 20, 1910, edition of The Marion Weekly Star of Marion, Ohio, lists his parents as Peter and Fanny Frederick.  It’s likely that her name was actually Fanny Elizabeth, the same as Jacob’s daughter.  The obituary also says that he was born on May 11, 1875, but that is obviously an error since it says he was 85 years old.  It also says he moved from Chillicothe, which is in Ross County, when he was young.  However, Peter and Fanny appear to have lived in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, from their married in 1813 until the 1830s.  Ross County was the home of a large Frederick family.  However, that family is fairly well documented and Peter does not fit into it.  It’s possible that the inaccurate information was provided by an ill-informed family member or friend or a staff member at the infirmary in Marion County, where Jacob spent his final years.  (2) Frederick’s obituary lists each marriage briefly.  Details on each marriage follow below.  Another marriage involving a Jacob Frederick appears in Wyandot County records, but it appears to involve a different man. On June 22, 1854, a Jacob Frederick – possibly a cousin – married Mary Drum. This marriage is recorded in Wyandot County Probate Court Marriage Book 2, page 105.  This couple appears in Ohio Township, Franklin County, Kan., in the 1860 Census.  (3) All information on Nora comes from her funeral book.  Confirmed in “Ohio, Births and Christenings, 1821-1962,” FamilySearch.com.  Fanny’s information comes from her death certificate, which was recorded Jan. 18, 1919, in Marion County, Ohio.  Clara’s information comes from her death certificate, filed in Wyandot County, Ohio, on Jan. 1, 1940.  Nancy Jane’s information comes from her death certificate, filed Jan. 14, 1924, in Marion County.  Amanda’s comes from her death certificate, filed March 18, 1939, in Marion County.  James Henry’s parents and birth date are listed in the Illinois death records available through FamilySearch.com. Emma’s parents, birth date and husband are listed in her death certificate at Ancestry.com, “Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947.”  Other children’s names and birth dates come from the 1850 Census of Jackson Township, Wyandot County, Ohio; the 1860 Census of the same township; and the 1880 U.S. Census of Montgomery Township, Marion County, Ohio. The last name of Carrie’s husband comes from an unpublished McDaniel genealogy provided by Ardeth Semler of Arlington, Ohio, in 1989.  A Carey Forider is listed as the spouse of Frederick Forider in the 1900 Census of Marion, Marion County, Ohio.  Her birth date is listed as May 1868.  Elizabeth’s marriage is recorded in “Marion County, Ohio – Marriages – Vol. 7,” extracted by Allen L. Potts, available at www.heritagepursuit.com/Marion /Marriages/marr7ef.htm.  Sarah’s husband is listed in “The History of Marion County, Ohio, 1893,” page 655.  The McDaniel genealogy attributes four children – Richard, Henry, Emma and Jane – to Jacob’s third wife, Mary.  However, Jane was born in 1851, which would make her the daughter of Mary McDaniel.  Henry’s death record specifically states that his mother was Mary McDaniels.  It seems certain that Richard was Catharine’s son since his age, according to the 1880 Census, would put his birth during Jacob and Catharine’s marriage.  In addition, Nora’s funeral book lists Carrie, Clara, Robert and Richard as siblings but doesn’t list her known half- or step-siblings, which would seem to indicate that Richard was her full brother.  (4) “The History of Wyandot County, Ohio,” page 835.  Jacob’s name appears – out of alphabetical order – at the end a list of real estate owners for that year, which may indicate that he was a late addition.  (5) Wyandot County Probate Court Marriage Book 1, page 104.  (6) “Wyandot County, Ohio, Cemetery Burial Records,” page 380.  (7) Wyandot County Probate Court Marriage Book 3, page 179.  The death certificate of her daughter Clara states that her first name was Caroline, but this seems unlikely in light of other evidence.  (8) Richard Dove is listed as a 39-year-old Farmer who was born in Virginia.  Sarah was 35, and was born in New York.  Their children were: Catharine, 25; William, 13; Sarah E, 11; Electia Ann (probably the name was really Electra Ann), 9; Mary Eta, 7; Emily, probably 7; John, 1; and Harry, 1.  All of the children were born in Ohio.  (9) In correspondence in 1999, Barbara Porter of Lakeside, Ariz., reported that Catharine Dove Frederick died Aug. 5, 1873 at Big Island, Marion County, Ohio, of consumption.  (10) The marriage to Mary Baker is found in “Ohio, Marriages, 1800-1958,” at index, FamilySearch.com.  The image reveals her identification as “Mrs. Mary Baker.”  (11) Ancestry.com, “Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880.”  (12) McDaniel genealogy.  (13) “Marion County Infirmary Records, 1902 to 1907,” available at the Marion Public Library.  (14) The death notice appears in the Aug. 13, 1910, edition of The Weekly Star of Marion, Ohio.  (15) Jacob’s death certificate issued Aug. 9, 1910, in Marion County, Ohio.